ISB News

ISB at Town Hall Seattle: The Future of Health

EVENT: ISB Panel on “The Future of Health”
DATE: April 3, 2017
TIME: 7:30 p.m.
COST: $5
TICKETS: townhallseattle.org/event/isb-panel-2/

Seattle’s Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) is revolutionizing science with a powerful approach to predict and prevent disease, and enable a sustainable environment. Explore the cross-disciplinary and collaborative approach of systems biology and how it is applied in the exploration of new frontiers in biology and medicine. This moderated forum will provide a focused discussion on the advances in major areas that affect human health, at both an individual and global level.

Panelists include:
Moderator Ross Reynolds, KUOW
Dr. Leroy Hood, ISB and Providence St. Joseph Health
Dr. Steven Kern, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Dr. Mike Snyder, Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Stanford

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