ISB News

ISB’s Dr. Eliza Peterson Earns TB Junior Investigator Award

Dr. Eliza Peterson, a senior research scientist who studies tuberculosis (TB) in the Institute for Systems Biology’s Baliga Lab, has been recognized by the University of Washington’s Tuberculosis Research and Training Center with a TB Junior Investigator Award.

“I feel like it’s not just an award for me, but for ISB and the Baliga Lab,” Peterson said in a video interview. “We’re relatively new to the TB research field, and I feel like this award is recognizing some of our research efforts and using our systems approaches to study TB.”

Peterson’s research focuses on regulatory network models to identify and understand the underlying complexity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the pathogen that causes TB. Peterson and collaborators have identified a regulator of essential genes necessary for the biosynthesis of mycolic acids, which make up a major component of MTB’s cell wall. These findings could potentially offer targets for future TB therapies.

The TB Junior Investigator Award recognizes the efforts of early-career scientists who have made significant contributions to the entire spectrum of TB research.

Learn more about Peterson’s research and where it will lead in the video above.

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